Scientists discover link between common medications and serious falls in older men

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 6:49pm
A significant link between serious falls causing injury in older men and a particular group of commonly used medicines has been identified by a group of researchers. Many medicines which are commonly prescribed for older people for bladder problems, depression, psychosis, insomnia, and respiratory problems, have anti-cholinergic effects. The medications affect the brain by blocking a key chemical called acetylcholine which is involved in passing messages between nerve cells. This can lead to side effects including blurred vision, increased heart rate, sedation and confusion.
Categories: A Broader View

Switching off street lights at night does not increase car crashes, crime

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 6:49pm
Reduced street lighting in England and Wales is not associated with road traffic collisions or crime, according to research. The study suggests that local authorities can safely reduce street lighting at night, saving energy costs and reducing carbon emissions.
Categories: A Broader View

Research grasps how brain plans gripping motion

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 6:49pm
A new study significantly advances neuroscientists' understanding of how a region of the brain formulates plans for the hand to grip an object. The findings could lead to direct application to improving brain-computer interface control over robotic arms and hands.
Categories: A Broader View

Tailored mobile health technologies may help patients take their medications appropriately

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 6:49pm
There was only a 5 percent error rate when patients with chronic kidney disease used mobile health technologies designed to help them use medications appropriately.
Categories: A Broader View

New tool uses 'drug spillover' to match cancer patients with treatments

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:52pm
A new article describes a new tool that improves the ability to match drugs to disease: the Kinase Addiction Ranker predicts what genetics are truly driving the cancer in any population of cells and chooses the best 'kinase inhibitor' to silence these dangerous genetic causes of disease.
Categories: A Broader View

Controlling phase changes in solids

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:52pm
Rewritable CDs, DVDs and Blu-Ray discs owe their existence to phase-change materials, those materials that change their internal order when heated and whose structures can be switched back and forth between their crystalline and amorphous phases. Phase-change materials have even more exciting applications on the horizon, but our limited ability to precisely control their phase changes is a hurdle to the development of new technology.
Categories: A Broader View

New chemistry makes strong bonds weak

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:52pm
Researchers have developed a new chemical reaction that breaks the strongest bond in a molecule instead of the weakest, completely reversing the norm for reactions in which bonds are evenly split to form reactive intermediates. The non-conventional reaction is a proof of concept that will allow chemists to access compounds that are normally off-limits to this pathway.
Categories: A Broader View

When being an immigrant makes it more–not less–likely to have a job

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:26pm
Race and education shape employment outcomes for U.S.- and foreign-born blacks in surprising ways. This is the first time researchers have examined how the interactions between race and nativity status affect employment outcomes. Up until now, research on nativity status and employment outcomes had been race-blind -- and those prior findings could not have been more different.
Categories: A Broader View

Coffee consumption habits impact the risk of mild cognitive impairment

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:25pm
A new study estimates the association between change or constant habits in coffee consumption and the incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), evaluating 1,445 individuals recruited from 5,632 subjects, aged 65-84 year old, from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging a population-based sample from eight Italian municipalities with a 3.5-year median follow-up.
Categories: A Broader View

More secondary schools serve healthier lunches

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:24pm
Secondary students found healthier foods on more lunch menus in 2013 than in 2011, resulting in fewer nutrition disparities for small schools or those with racially diverse student bodies.
Categories: A Broader View

Short wavelength plasmons observed in nanotubes

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:24pm
Researchers have observed 'Luttinger-liquid' plasmons in metallic single-walled nanotubes. This holds great promise for novel plasmonic and nanophotonic devices over a broad frequency range, including telecom wavelengths.
Categories: A Broader View

World's first bilateral hand transplant on child

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:24pm
Surgeons recently completed the world's first bilateral hand transplant on a child. Earlier this month, the surgical team successfully transplanted donor hands and forearms onto 8-year-old Zion Harvey who, several years earlier, had undergone amputation of his hands and feet and a kidney transplant following a serious infection.
Categories: A Broader View

Autism costs estimated to reach nearly $500 billion, potentially $1 trillion, by 2025

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:24pm
Health economists have for the first time projected the total costs of caring for all people with autism spectrum disorder in the United States for the current calendar year and in 10 years if effective interventions and preventive treatments for the condition are not identified and widely available.
Categories: A Broader View

Researchers provide new details about sea stars' immunity

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:24pm
A study examining sea stars dying along the West Coast provides new clues about the starfish's immune response and its ability to protect a diverse coastal ecosystem. The team found that the sea stars have an immune response that is characterized by various types of immunities and that they have multiple aspects of the toll-signaling pathway, which is an important recognition.
Categories: A Broader View

Parents' health literacy affects child weight-loss tactics, study finds

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:24pm
Parents who are less health literate may choose weight-loss strategies for their children that are unhealthy or not recommended. Governmental weight-control info may not be reaching families who need it most.
Categories: A Broader View

Sleepy fruitflies get mellow

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:24pm
Whether you're a human, a mouse, or even a fruitfly, losing sleep is a bad thing, leading to physiological effects and behavioral changes. Researchers used fruitflies to probe deeper into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern aggression and sleep and found that sleep deprivation reduces aggression in fruitflies and affects their reproductive fitness. They identified a related molecular pathway that might govern recovery of normal aggressive behaviors.
Categories: A Broader View

Past and present sea levels in the Chesapeake Bay Region, USA

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:24pm
Scientists write that sea-level rise (3.4 mm/yr) is faster in the Chesapeake Bay region than any other location on the Atlantic coast of North America, and twice the global average (1.7 mm/yr). They have found that dated interglacial deposits suggest that relative sea levels in the Chesapeake Bay region deviate from global trends over a range of timescales.
Categories: A Broader View

How to digitally stoke that old-time auction fever

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:24pm
The authors explore the impact of time pressure and social competition on bidders in online auctions and how those factors influence auction results and users' experience.
Categories: A Broader View

Chimpanzees binge on clay to detox and boost the minerals in their diet

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:24pm
Wild chimpanzees in the forests of Uganda are increasingly eating clay to supplement the minerals in their diet, according to a long-term international study . The article describes how the researchers observed wild chimpanzees in the Budongo forest eating and drinking from clay pits and termite mounds.
Categories: A Broader View

Effects over time of tobacco tax increases in New Zealand

Science News Daily - July 28, 2015 - 3:24pm
Annual 10 percent tobacco tax increases in New Zealand over the next 20 years should lead to health gains, net health system cost savings and modest reductions of about 2 percent to 3 percent in health inequalities between indigenous and non-indigenous people, according to a new study.
Categories: A Broader View

Lost Medicaid Funding

To date, the failure to expand Medicaid / TennCare has cost the State of Tennessee ? in lost federal funding.