News aggregator

Understanding Greenland Ice Sheet's meltwater channels

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 5:59pm
Observations of moulins (vertical conduits connecting water on top of the glacier down to the bed of the ice sheet) and boreholes in Greenland show that subglacial channels ameliorate the speedup caused by water delivery to the base of the ice sheet in the short term. By mid summer, however, the channels stabilize and are unable to grow any larger.
Categories: A Broader View

Understanding Greenland Ice Sheet's meltwater channels

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 5:59pm
Observations of moulins (vertical conduits connecting water on top of the glacier down to the bed of the ice sheet) and boreholes in Greenland show that subglacial channels ameliorate the speedup caused by water delivery to the base of the ice sheet in the short term. By mid summer, however, the channels stabilize and are unable to grow any larger.
Categories: A Broader View

Hospitals with aggressive treatment styles had lower failure-to-rescue rates

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 5:59pm
Hospitals with aggressive treatment styles, also known as high hospital care intensity, had lower rates of patients dying from a major complication but longer hospitalizations.
Categories: A Broader View

Hospitals with aggressive treatment styles had lower failure-to-rescue rates

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 5:59pm
Hospitals with aggressive treatment styles, also known as high hospital care intensity, had lower rates of patients dying from a major complication but longer hospitalizations.
Categories: A Broader View

Hypertension risk rises closer to major roadways

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 5:57pm
In a newly published analysis, the risk of high blood pressure among 5,400 post-menopausal women was higher the closer they lived to a major roadway. The result, which accounts for a wide variety of possible confounding factors, adds to concerns that traffic exposure may present public health risks.
Categories: A Broader View

Hypertension risk rises closer to major roadways

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 5:57pm
In a newly published analysis, the risk of high blood pressure among 5,400 post-menopausal women was higher the closer they lived to a major roadway. The result, which accounts for a wide variety of possible confounding factors, adds to concerns that traffic exposure may present public health risks.
Categories: A Broader View

Spiders: Survival of the fittest group

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 5:44pm
Researchers have uncovered the first-ever field-based evidence for a biological mechanism called 'group selection' contributing to local adaptation in natural populations. Evolutionary theorists have been debating the existence and power of group selection for decades. Now two scientists have observed it in the wild.
Categories: A Broader View

Spiders: Survival of the fittest group

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 5:44pm
Researchers have uncovered the first-ever field-based evidence for a biological mechanism called 'group selection' contributing to local adaptation in natural populations. Evolutionary theorists have been debating the existence and power of group selection for decades. Now two scientists have observed it in the wild.
Categories: A Broader View

Decreased ability to identify odors can predict death: Olfactory dysfunction is a harbinger of mortality

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 2:55pm
The inability of older adults to identify scents is a strong predictor of death within five years. Almost 40% of those who failed a smelling test died during that period, compared to 10% of those with a healthy sense of smell. Olfactory dysfunction predicted mortality better than a diagnosis of heart failure or cancer.
Categories: A Broader View

Decreased ability to identify odors can predict death: Olfactory dysfunction is a harbinger of mortality

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 2:55pm
The inability of older adults to identify scents is a strong predictor of death within five years. Almost 40% of those who failed a smelling test died during that period, compared to 10% of those with a healthy sense of smell. Olfactory dysfunction predicted mortality better than a diagnosis of heart failure or cancer.
Categories: A Broader View

First diagnosed case of Ebola in the U.S.: What now?

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 2:44pm
A patient being treated at a Dallas hospital is the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, health officials announced yesterday. Now that the first case has been reported, what does this all mean for the rest of the country, and what types of precautions should Americans take?
Categories: A Broader View

First diagnosed case of Ebola in the U.S.: What now?

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 2:44pm
A patient being treated at a Dallas hospital is the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, health officials announced yesterday. Now that the first case has been reported, what does this all mean for the rest of the country, and what types of precautions should Americans take?
Categories: A Broader View

Swirling cloud at Titan's pole is cold and toxic

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 1:00pm
Scientists analyzing data from NASA's Cassini mission have discovered that a giant, toxic cloud is hovering over the south pole of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, after the atmosphere there cooled dramatically. The scientists found that this giant polar vortex contains frozen particles of the toxic compound hydrogen cyanide, or HCN.
Categories: A Broader View

Swirling cloud at Titan's pole is cold and toxic

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 1:00pm
Scientists analyzing data from NASA's Cassini mission have discovered that a giant, toxic cloud is hovering over the south pole of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, after the atmosphere there cooled dramatically. The scientists found that this giant polar vortex contains frozen particles of the toxic compound hydrogen cyanide, or HCN.
Categories: A Broader View

Fertility preservation option for young boys with cancer

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 12:34pm
Treatments for certain childhood cancers come with a high risk of sterility. A new research study for young boys is focused on fertility preservation and restoration.
Categories: A Broader View

Why wet feels wet: Understanding the illusion of wetness

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 12:34pm
Though it seems simple, feeling that something is wet is quite a feat because our skin does not have receptors that sense wetness. UK researchers propose that wetness perception is intertwined with our ability to sense cold temperature and tactile sensations such as pressure and texture.
Categories: A Broader View

Gut bacteria are protected by host during illness

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 12:34pm
To protect their gut microbes during illness, sick mice produce specialized sugars in the gut that feed their microbiota and maintain a healthy microbial balance. This protective mechanism also appears to help resist or tolerate additional harmful pathogens, and its disruption may play a role in human diseases such as Crohn’s disease.
Categories: A Broader View

Coral reef winners and losers as water temperatures rise

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 12:32pm
Contrary to the popular research-based assumption that the world's coral reefs are doomed, a new longitudinal study paints a brighter picture of how corals may fare in the future. A subset of present coral fauna will likely populate oceans as water temperatures continue to rise, researchers have reported.
Categories: A Broader View

New frontier in error-correcting codes

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 12:32pm
Error-correcting codes are one of the glories of the information age: They're what guarantee the flawless transmission of digital information over the airwaves or through copper wire, even in the presence of the corrupting influences that engineers call "noise."
Categories: A Broader View

Intervention helps decrease 'mean girl' behaviors, researchers find

Science News Daily - October 1, 2014 - 12:32pm
Relational aggression, or 'mean girl' bullying, is a popular subject in news and entertainment media. This nonphysical form of aggression generally used among adolescent girls includes gossiping, rumor spreading, exclusion and rejection. As media coverage has illustrated, relational aggression can lead to tragic and sometimes fatal outcomes. Researchers have now developed and tested an intervention that effectively decreases relational aggression among teen girls.
Categories: A Broader View